Thursday, August 23, 2018

4 Tips for Making Home Life Nurturing for Your Kids

Image via Pixabay

Every good parent wants their children to thrive and to have every opportunity to become the best possible versions of themselves. To a large degree, this begins in the home, and in the kind of environment that you, as a parent, create for them there.

No matter how active outgoing your child is, and no matter how many extracurricular activities and hobby groups you get them involved with, they will, by necessity, spend a huge proportion of their time in the family home until they reach adulthood.

Children who have supportive and nurturing structures set up in their home lives are that much more likely to maintain a positive mood and orientation towards the world, and life in general. They’re more likely to be confident and assertive in their dealings with others, and they are less likely to wallow in resentment and bitterness when they face the cruelty and disappointment that we all encounter from time to time throughout the course of our lives.

So, if you are wondering about ways to turn your home life into a nurturing and uplifting experience and environment for your children, here are a few basic tips and suggestions to get you started.

Childproof as needed

Obviously, your first priority as a parent is to be attentive and do not allow your children to come to harm. While it’s one thing if an older child scratches their knee while playing in the garden, it’s a completely different thing if your toddler suffers a bad injury in the home because you were negligent about the kind of environment you had set up for them.

While you don’t want to helicopter parent and try to shelter your kids from all kinds of potential harm and danger, throughout their lives, you absolutely must ensure a safe home environment, for your young children especially.

Child safety at home is a major issue, and in order to ensure that you’re doing everything in your power to keep things as safe and well-managed as possible, you should strongly consider reading through various leading guides on childproofing homes, and buy whatever equipment is necessary to get the job done.

You’ll want child-proof portable fences that can be put up to prevent your child from falling down the stairs or wandering into the kitchen or any other areas of the house where it would be dangerous for them to be.

You’ll also want childproof locks for your cupboards, and will need to be attentive to things like which bits of furniture are liable to collapse when a baby or toddler tugs at them or tries to clamber over them. 


Reduce the prevalence of electronics, and make digital recreation more of a shared pastime

The digital technology of the present day brings with it all sorts of benefits, from faster and easier communication than people could have dreamed of even just a few decades ago, to easy access to the vast treasure troves of human knowledge, and more.

For all the genuinely amazing benefits of our technology, though, it can also cause us to become more distant and alienated from one another, not to mention less actively engaged in the workings of the world around us.

This is especially true for children and teenagers who, if given a chance, will tend to be all too happy to spend all of their waking hours hidden away in their bedrooms playing video games, surfing the net, or watching TV.

Various research has suggested that this kind of tech-heavy life can have serious and detrimental effects on the development of young children and that teenagers can become increasingly withdrawn and antisocial if they withdraw too much into the internet and other forms of digital media.

To ensure that your house is a healthy and nurturing environment for your kids, limit the prevalence of electronics, and make digital recreation more of a shared, than a solitary pastime.

Keep the TV in the living room, and have the family gather around together to watch a movie or TV show in the evening. Keep the family computer in a shared area, and don’t be too enthusiastic about giving your little ones iPads and smartphones. Let imagination, books, and low-tech toys be the main order of the day.


Allow everyone to have their space

While you don’t want your kids to isolate themselves in their rooms with their computers, you also don’t want to try and force them to spend every waking moment in the company of the family.

Children — especially as they grow and develop a sense of who they are and who they want to be — need to have their own space. Set things up in the home so that your kids each have their own bedroom, if possible, make sure that they are able to spend time alone when they need to.

It’s all a matter of balance, here. As a parent, it’s your job to know when to bring your children back into the shared family space, and when to back off and let them be on their own.


Eat meals together

Even though your kids may not always know it, they will benefit from regular attention from and communication with their parents. In fact, they need it in order to develop into well-adjusted adults.

One of the best rituals you can implement in the family home is to have set meal times, where the family sits down and eats together.

Not only does this provide an anchor of stability that everyone in the family can rely on for a sense of familiarity and order when times are tough, but it also brings the family together and forces them to interact with one another, when everyone might otherwise be easily distracted by their own concerns and preoccupations.

Simple things like the conversation around the dinner or breakfast table can have a truly major impact on the wellbeing of your children, and on you as well.

Small talk around the dinner table can also be, depending on the situation, a great avenue for discovering more about what’s on your child’s mind on a day-to-day basis.

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